Summer madness…

Hi guys!

Sorry, we have been really busy. Colin and Andrew have played a closed tournament in Dundee. As you can see elsewhere, Andrew won his first closed GM-tournament, but did not make the norm.

Personally, I have been to Copenhagen, Berlin, San Sebastian and San Francisco this summer. Partly on holiday and partly working on projects/training. I am now back at home, preparing for a 6 player-training camp that starts on Saturday. The first two players arrive Thursday and four more on Friday. Four GMs and two IMs. I hope we will have a great week.

Colin is laying the final hands on Grandmaster Repertoire – Pirc Defence by Mihail Marin and Andrew is finishing Playing 1.d4 d5 – A Classical Repertoire by Nikolaos Ntirlis, also known as Nikos.

On Wednesday we are publishing e3 Poison by Axel Smith and Chess Behind Bars by Carl Portman. It is also the release date for the paperback version of Dynamic Decision Making in Chess by Boris Gelfand and yours truly. The hardback was released exactly a year ago during the XtraCon Open in Copenhagen. Quality Chess sponsored the event this year as well. It was won by Jobava after some amazing fighting chess…

Today I am a year older. And a lot of kg lighter… See for yourself!

323 thoughts on “Summer madness…”

  1. Jacob Aagaard

    Deliberately no publication dates for these two books. Should also mention that Sharp Endgames by Lund is far advanced.

  2. I am curious to look at an excerpt of Sharp Endgames by E. Lund
    And his own definition of critical moments 🙂

  3. @AJZ
    Sorry, this is almost done too. We are talking a bit of polishing. Will also make the next round of publications for sure.

  4. @Boki
    I was on a holiday with my girlfriend. Would love to come back. If anyone wants to organise a training camp there, I would love to come. Really love the city.

  5. I bougth playing 1.e4 by John Show vol. 1. One of the best chess books ever. Really, it is. Is there any news about second volume? Is the 2017. possible term?

  6. @Jacob
    Glad you liked Berlin
    I am shure there would be a lot of interest in Berlin for such a Training camp. I was quite impressed by the coverage of your trip to Asia.
    Maybe we could try to arrange something?

  7. Good to hear that the Pirc is not that far off…..as it is a reasonably complex opening with regard to move order, would it be possible to give a slightly better insight than usual into what variations Marin is offering when posting the index extract?

  8. LE BRUIT QUI COURT

    Jacob,
    You said that you promised to Dvoretsky’s widow that you will republish his work, namely the two series: School of chess excellence and School of future champions.
    Can you please tell us when this will happen, or should we depend on old edition by Edition Olms.

  9. @LE BRUIT QUI COURT

    What do you mean with relying on the old Olms edition ? Do you posses those books ? And if yes, why on earth would you buy them again ???

    I know that a lot of (amatuer) chessplayers have OCD when it comes to buying/possessing chessbooks, but buying the same exact book because its from a different publisher is quite extreme.

    And in my opinion Olms is in the same category as QC regarding quality. I even prefer their lay-out.

  10. LE BRUIT QUI COURT :
    Jacob,
    You said that you promised to Dvoretsky’s widow that you will republish his work, namely the two series: School of chess excellence and School of future champions.
    Can you please tell us when this will happen, or should we depend on old edition by Edition Olms.

    Did he promise? I thought he said that he had told her that he would be honoured to, but nothing was discussed?

  11. mr :
    @LE BRUIT QUI COURT
    What do you mean with relying on the old Olms edition ? Do you posses those books ? And if yes, why on earth would you buy them again ???
    I know that a lot of (amatuer) chessplayers have OCD when it comes to buying/possessing chessbooks, but buying the same exact book because its from a different publisher is quite extreme.
    And in my opinion Olms is in the same category as QC regarding quality. I even prefer their lay-out.

    Dvoretsky mentioned in an interview that he had 100s of improvements on his earlier books, but his publisher ( = Olms) didn’t want to include them.
    Probably a money thing. Many changes, new editing, updated layout, proof reading once again. All this costs money … for an update of an old product. “As is” all they have to do is update a few numbers in the imprint and then send an order to the printer for whatever number of books their sales department says.

  12. Alfonso Gisbert

    First of all Congratulations for the excelent Books you are editing, but is there any project for The Spanish Opening, for white? It could be great since there is a long time since something was edited for the spanish opening for white.

  13. @Andre
    The story is correct as far as I know. But I do not want to comment on other publishers in general. Although I am happy to allow any comparison between our products and those of our competition.

  14. Seems like most of the books we ‘know about’ will be published by Sept/Oct.

    I’m intersted to see what QC are planning next.

    I’m hoping the Najdorf book will be a high priority.
    Simply don’t understand why its taken so long!

  15. @Frank van Tellingen Jacob answered this a few comments up:

    Q. First of all Congratulations for the excellent books you are editing, but is there any project for The Spanish Opening, for white? It could be great since there is a long time since something was edited for the spanish opening for white.

    A. Negi 6, probably next year.

  16. @Frank van Tellingen
    Negi 6 will include all remaining 1 e4 e4 2 Nf3 according to older posts. The Philidor has already been covered in Negi, so that leaves something like The Elephant, The Latvian, The Petroff and then the whole of the Spanish. That will be a big book considering Chess Stars covered it in the early 2000s and that was a very thick book.

    James

  17. Hi Jacob,

    Just wondering where we are up to with Avrukh 3? Been a little quiet on that on over the last few weeks.

    Also, will you be putting more titles in the ‘Coming Soon’ section as it is looking a little skinny…

    Thank you very much.

    James

  18. James2:

    I own Negi 2-4 but not Negi 1. Are those philidor lines in Negi 1 only lines related to a 1.e4 d6 Phillidor move order? It would be incredibly annoying if Negi 6 is not a full repertoire for 1.e4 e5 2.nf3 and it refers back to volume 1.

    Those chess stars books took two volumes to cover 1.e4 e5 2.nf3, so this one volume time is ambitious.

  19. @David T Negi 1 covers the ‘pure philidor’ move order with 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 etc and also it covers 1 e4 d6 2 d4 Nf6 3 Nc3 e5 (not 3…Nbd7). The excerpt in the opening section shows the contents.

    I think you would need both books 1 and 6 to be able to have a full repertoire after 1 e4 e5.

    James

  20. @Jacob Aagaard
    Excellent! I’m looking forward to that one with updated coverage on the King’s Indian and Grunfeld.

    I suppose I’m looking forward to all of the upcoming books, such as Negi 5, Avrukh 3, Shaw 2, Marin Pirc, Niko 1 d4 d5. Busy times at the QC HQ I imagine….

    James

  21. David T :
    James2:
    I own Negi 2-4 but not Negi 1. Are those philidor lines in Negi 1 only lines related to a 1.e4 d6 Phillidor move order? It would be incredibly annoying if Negi 6 is not a full repertoire for 1.e4 e5 2.nf3 and it refers back to volume 1.

    John Shaw covers both e5 and Philidor move orders too. John’s book is more detailed in the minor lines, which Negi doesn’t think are worth much space in GM Rep book. The solutions to the more important lines are different in both books.
    So you could also consider to get John’s book.

  22. @David T

    David T :
    James2:
    I own Negi 2-4 but not Negi 1. Are those philidor lines in Negi 1 only lines related to a 1.e4 d6 Phillidor move order? It would be incredibly annoying if Negi 6 is not a full repertoire for 1.e4 e5 2.nf3 and it refers back to volume 1.
    Those chess stars books took two volumes to cover 1.e4 e5 2.nf3, so this one volume time is ambitious.

    I assume it’s hard to distinguish lines only related to a 1.e4 d6 move order from the rest of the Philidor, as you can reach the Philidor via 1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 e5 and don’t have to play 3…Nbd7. Also what would you gain, if it covered – let’s say – the Hanham only? You can still reach it via 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 move order. And in general: What’s the point of having a complete repertoire after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 in one volume if Black can still choose Caro-Kann, French etc. after your 1.e4?

    Hanham, Antoshin etc. it’s all there in volume 1. With Antoshin etc. handled under “minor lines”. So unless Negi does a little bit of Kontronias and updates previous volumes in the final one, I suppose he won’t return to the Philidor.

    I agree that Shaw is a good source here. While Negi suggests a Bf4/Be2 hybrid against the Antoshin for instance, Shaw recommends the g3 lines. Both are good for White, but the latter might be a bit simpler.

  23. Good morning Jacob and John,

    I was wondering how Playing 1 e4 volume 2 was getting on? I think at the beginning of the year we were all hopeful that it might be a release in 2017. Is it likely we will be holding the book in our hands before 31st December or is it now more likely to be a release early in 2018?

    Thank you.

    James

  24. Hello Jacob,
    e3 Poison really really is a fantastic book, I think. But I failed to find a hint as to what White should do after 1.Nf3 d6 with the idea …Bg4. Say, 2.d4 Bg4, and now e3(!), I guess, but then what?
    Anyway, Keep up the good work!

  25. @Yozhik
    1…d6 2.d4 Bg4 is mentioned briefly in the Dutch chapter, on page 237. It’s a slightly odd place to include it, but it didn’t really fit into any other part of the book so I guess Axel thought this was the best place to put it. For what it’s worth, 3.e3 seems like a reasonable move there although Axel gives a different idea.

  26. @James2
    So much work has been done. Still, we are probably too ambitious with this project, so we are still some months out. How many? If I make a projection, the combined laughter of the people on the block may kick the planet out of orbit…

  27. Reyk:

    “What’s the point of having a complete repertoire after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 in one volume if Black can still choose Caro-Kann, French etc. after your 1.e4?”

    I have different books for my CK and French repertoire. Like many players, my white repertoire is pieced together from many books to get the systems I want. My current 1.e4e5 repertoire is based on the two volumes from chess stars, supplemented with my own research. These need updating, and it is unfortunate I have to buy a second book just for a chapter or two on the philidor. I think it is illogical to not put all of 1.e4 e5 in one book. At least Negi didn’t put the Petroff in volume 5, the Latvian in volume 2, and the elephant gambit in volume 3.

  28. John Shaw :
    I am confident the 2nd Volume of Playing 1.e4 will be published on a Wednesday.

    What a relief to hear the book comes out before Britain leaves the Gregorian calendar.

  29. @ David T:

    “It’s illogical to not put all of 1.e4 e5 in one book.” I don’t see why this is any more illogical than not putting all of 1.e4 c5 in one book. I think there’s only a limited amount of pages a book can have and still be commercially viable. And it is even doubtful if the Spanish can fit into one volume (Berlin, Marshall, Breyer, Zaitsev, Tschigorin, Open Spanish are just some major options which each in itself could merit a separate book), so I wouldn’t be surprised if the Negi series will end up with 7 volumes rather than 6. I guess the consequence of mixing and matching from different authors is that every once in a while you end up buying a book which you use only a part of.

  30. @Ray:

    I think it may go 2 volumes as well. The phillidor appears to be a meager 2 chapters of 37 from Negi 1, I think they could have fit such a small section it in with the other e4e5 materials. The Sicilian in a case where the total pages are so large it can’t be printed as one book. In this case it makes sense to print over multiple volumes. Although it would not have made sense to mix 1/6th of it across each of the six books as there will be people just buying for the Sicilian coverage.

  31. @Yozhik @Andrew Greet

    I’m also struggling with the various move orders and where they are covered. I’m solving this by entering all the theoretical lines into Chess Opening Wizard (free plug to great software!) as I read the book. This will pick up the transpostions and show if there are any major moves that are not covered.

  32. @John Don’t think that’s meant to be the approach with e3 poison. Think supposed to learn the structures, and then go free form between 1.Nf3, 1e3, 1c4 and 1d4 etc dependent on mood or opponent. Not really sure if it is genius or umm not. It’s the sort of thing could easily imagine being written in the 60’s, will be interesting to see what reviewer’s make of it. There are so nicely annotated games. One of the more interesting one a Tarrasch French were white deliberately exchanges IQP. Think need to be quite an advanced player to make the most of it.

  33. @John Simmons and @John
    I’ve just received the book yesterday and just browsed it 2 hours. I think that you sump up perfectly the book: a lot of things (openings/middelgames/annotated games/psychology/thoughts/quotes) and you take what you want when you want.

    It could be perhaps possible to extend the choices with cumming’s 1 c4 repertoire which goes with e3 lines ?

  34. I got it yesterday too, and really just looked at the intro and the Grunfeld chapter. At the least it is an interesting take, it will take some more reading to really form an opinion.

  35. I got the book “e3 poison” today’s early morning and I came late to my work as I couldn’t stop myself from reading it 😀
    I have no idea if I will play this in serious games as I play too many openings with white, but I just enjoy reading books which I can read from cover to cover (GM repertoire series is more like encyclopedia or dictionary). Also I love the concept of opening repertoire based on chess understanding rather than remembering lots of lines, that’s a practical choice for an amateur and chess lover like me who still wants to get a GM title.

  36. @David T
    If they put the Philidor coverage in with 1. e4 e5, some people would complain that it’s not in the same volume as the Pirc. You can’t please everyone.

    I would just like to see the series done.

  37. What I really love about e3 Poision are the chapter introductions with thorough discussions of the various pawn structures. This is something I often miss in opening books. But it’s indeed a move order puzzle if you want to stick to one first move (in my case 1.Nf3). I don’t want to allow the Slav (I’m using Delchev’s anti-Slav repertoire) and the Queen’s Gambit, and then 1.d4 is not the best choice 🙂

  38. Hi all at QC,

    With the start of the new season looming, I wanted to ask if it is likely that we will be holding Negi 5 in our hands by 25th December 2017….? (This seems hopeful as Negi has been busy and we haven’t heard anything on it of late).

    Thanks as always.

    James

  39. I was thinking, to cut down on Negi’s workload, he could play (in the mainline Ruy Lopez after 7..0-0) he could advocate 8 d4 (to avoid the Marshall) and then after the most probable reply of 8..d6, then 9 c3 transposing to the Bogolubow variation.

    If he was to use this as his mainline after 7..d6 8 c3 0-0 9 d4 (not h3) then he would avoid all of the variations after C92 to C99. After the most expected response of 9 Bg4 then he could essay 10 d5. I notice that Negi has played this way but also you could investigate 10 Be3. I’m not sure this will happen as I think the point of the series is to give lines against the absolute mainlines so by not playing 9 h3 one could argue it is ducking the theoretical battle.

    Anyway, if Negi isn’t doing 9 d4 it would be nice to see it somewhere. Negi obviously likes it.

    James

  40. The e3 book is, at the least, one of the more interesting books I’ve looked at in a while. I like the pawn structure discussion, I may like the philosophy even more. I am about to start looking at the QGD and QGA sections. I don’t think the King’s Indian parts are as convincing as the rest of the repertoire, but I want to look at that again. I think it may be Smith’s second book of the year.

  41. LE BRUIT QUI COURT

    Jacob,

    Is there any chance to publish GM Guide 1.c4 for White? It would be most welcome book with first class opening like English. Marin’s 3 tomes might be daunting for practical/club players…

    Please make it happen…

    Thanks.

  42. @James2
    The d3 lines will cut down on a lot of theory and provide chances for a White advantage. That would be my guess on the Ruy repertoire. If everything is covered in the Ruy Lopez it could go over 1,000 pages. I would be surprised if White can get an edge with the 9 d4 lines, White may even need to be careful.

    I agree with John, I just received e3 poison yesterday and I really like it. An idea book that covers a broad territory. I am trying to figure out if there are any omissions in the repertoire and the transitions. But, the ideas are great. Trying to figure out if I put it up there with Playing 1 e4 e5, A Classical Repertoire, by Ntirlis, which is my favorite opening book of all time. My only quibble with that book is Ntirlis quoted about 30 more games in the book to look at which for completeness, I wish had been included. I am sure they were cut to keep it at 400 pages.

  43. More good news for Modern/Pirc players. In Playing 1.e4 Vol 1 The following line is given on page 569 as slightly better for White: 1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nf3 d6 4.Bc4 Nf6 5.Qe2 Bg4 6.0-0 Nc6 7.Rd1 e5 8.c3 0-0 9.h3 Bxf3 10.Qxf3 exd4 11.cxd4 Nd7 12.Be3 Nb6 13.Bb3 Na5 14.Nc3 Nxb3 15.axb3 however closer examination reveals that Black is fine in this position, and in fact it is White who is in danger of easily becoming worse after say 15…Re8 for e.g.

    Shaw mentions in the book that GM Borki Predojevic on chessopenings24-7.com considers the above position after 10.Qf3 as slightly better for White, but Borki has since updated this file giving the assessment as equal but without further analysis.

    I like this simple 4.Bc4 concept against the Modern and I’m hoping the Quality Chess Team can find something I missed to make this line promising for White again.

  44. @ Doug Eckert

    I don’t think it would make sense to recommend the Ruy Lopez without going for the main lines, as in the rest of the series. Besides, even if the d3 lines would indeed provide chances for a white advantage (which I seriously doubt), there is also the dreaded Berlin, which really is equal. The whole world top has moved on to the Slow Italian nowadays, so if Negi would recommend lines with d2-d3 i.m.o. it would be more logical to choose the Slow Italian than the Ruy Lopez with d2-d3, since the former would rule out the Berlin.

  45. LE BRUIT QUI COURT

    Jacob Aagaard :
    @LE BRUIT QUI COURT
    Sounds sensible

    This would be very well received…to have an elite opening in one book for aspiring players…

    Competing recent titles, besides Marin’s opus magnum are:

    1. Craig Pritchett: Play the English!
    2. Alexander Khalifman: 1.Nf3 – Opening for White according to Kramnik 3
    3. David Cummings: The English

    Who could be the author?

  46. LE BRUIT QUI COURT :

    Jacob Aagaard :
    @LE BRUIT QUI COURT
    Sounds sensible

    This would be very well received…to have an elite opening in one book for aspiring players…
    Competing recent titles, besides Marin’s opus magnum are:
    1. Craig Pritchett: Play the English!
    2. Alexander Khalifman: 1.Nf3 – Opening for White according to Kramnik 3
    3. David Cummings: The English
    Who could be the author?

    “The Full English Opening: Mastering the Fundamentals” by Carsten Hansen by another publisher is on the way

  47. Hi all at QC HQ,

    It warmed my heat to see two new additional pictures in the coming soon section today. Especially looking forward to Nikos 1 d4 d5 book. I think it will be just the thing I’ve been looking for for a long time.

    I have the Kornev Pirc book by Chess Stars and I’m not altogether happy with some of the Pirc lines advocated. I’m looking forward to what Marin suggests, but more importantly, his explanations.

    Thanks all.

    James

  48. @Jacob …..Any chance that either the Pirc or the QGD could be on sale at Chess & Bridge by the 13th of September as I will be in London through to the 20th?

  49. I am guessing that the order option should come soon on the Pirc and 1. d4 d5 books…anticipating mid-September release, hopefully.

  50. LE BRUIT QUI COURT

    I’m really appreciating and supporting individuals like Ntrilis. He is an average rank-and-file player who proved that hard work, enthusiasm and sheer determination can you lead you to the top. Look at him now: he is an opening, corr and opening specialist, second to GM’s and Olympic teams. Congratulations!

    Besides Nikos, I like also Tony Rotella and Martin Lokander who share common chess path. As said somewhere on the blog, a joint Ntrilis/Rotella venture on GM Guide Kalashnikov is very welcomed.

    After Nikos finishes Playing 1.e4 e5, please put another challenging task upon him: to write GM Guide 1.c4 English for White 🙂

    PS Jacob, please consider rewarding your best book authors by us, fans and book buyers… You could open PayPal account on which we could donate some sum for beloved author. This could be also a good motivation for future releases…

  51. I’m really curious about the page count for 1.d4 d5 since the book will cover so much ground – QGD main lines, d4 sidelines as well as 1.c4/Nf3 (QGD vs. Reti). I wonder if 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 is covered – white’s most poisonous move order. 😉

  52. LE BRUIT QUI COURT

    @Jacob Aagaard
    Donation would be a kind of support for future releases…i.e. if he is the author of GM Guide Kalashnikov for Black, or GM Guide English for White, then I’ll donate right now!

  53. Glenn Snow :
    @Topnotch
    The computer says 6.e5! is very good for White.

    Thanks for the reply Glen, I am pretty sure I examined 6.e5 and concluded that Black was fine. I will check my file when I get home from work this evening to confirm and post a follow up then.

    In the meantime thoughts are welcome from other posters regarding this line against the Modern from Playing 1.e4 Volume 1.

  54. Would Berg be interested in updating how the 13…b5 line of the Main line Winawer with 7. Dg4 0-0 8. Ld3 Sbc6 in his Winawer book is going nowadays? Have not heard much about this line lately.

  55. Topnotch :

    Glenn Snow :
    @Topnotch
    The computer says 6.e5! is very good for White.

    Thanks for the reply Glen, I am pretty sure I examined 6.e5 and concluded that Black was fine. I will check my file when I get home from work this evening to confirm and post a follow up then.
    In the meantime thoughts are welcome from other posters regarding this line against the Modern from Playing 1.e4 Volume 1.

    Ok I checked my file and as suspected Black is doing fine so long as he is well prepared. A key game here is: Kudryavtsev,Yaroslav Viktorovic – Vorobiyov,Pavel Aleksandrovic (2270) [B06]
    RUS/TC5/Final (RUS) ICCF, 15.09.2009
    1.e4 d6 2.d4 g6 3.Nf3 Bg7 4.Bc4 Nf6 5.Qe2 Nc6 6.e5 dxe5 7.dxe5 Ng4 8.e6 Bxe6 9.Bxe6 fxe6 10.Ng5 [10.Qxe6 Nd4! 11.Qxg4 (11.Nxd4? Qxd4 12.0-0 Nxf2 wins for Black) Nxc2+ 12.Ke2 Nxa1 13.Rd1 Qc8 14.Qc4 Qf5 (I. Chirila – G. Szabo, Amara 2007) 15.Nc3!= White has sufficient compensation but no more than that] 10…Nd4 11.Qxg4 Nxc2+ 12.Ke2 0-0 [12…Qd7!?] 13.Na3 Nd4+ [13…Nxa1 14.Qh3 h6 is also fine for Black] 14.Kf1 Qd6! = Drawn on move 51.

    And as you say Glen, Playing 1.e4 does mention 6.e5 but does not assess it as good only unclear. Perhaps you…

  56. And as you say Glen, Playing 1.e4 does mention 6.e5 but does not assess it as good only unclear. Perhaps you are conflating the game position with the one reached after 5…0-0 or 5…Bg4 when I agree 6.e5 is a promising continuation.

  57. Come on, come on, come on with the typesetting Jacob!!! I think we’re all very eager for Nikos’ new book as Playing 1 e4 e5 was such a good read. :0)

    Looking forward to it very much.

    James

  58. @Andrew Greet
    Hi Andrew,

    Does this mean that 1 c4 e6 2 Nf3 d5 3 g3 Nf6 4 Bg2 (starting either 1 c4/1 Nf3) is being met by 4 dxc4, and then 5 Qa4+ c6? This would seem to be consistent, and Yusupov also recommends it in his series of books.

    (If it is this line then hopefully 5 Qa4+ won’t be met by 5..Bd7/6..c5/7..Bc6. That has been popular lately but it doesn’t appeal to me.)

    I know I shouldn’t be fishing for information but anyway….

    Thank you.

    James

  59. @James2
    Nikos recommends the line that doesn’t appeal to you. Have a look at his analysis when the book comes out; you never know, you might grow to like it. If not, just do your own research on 5…c6 or some other option.

  60. @Andrew Greet
    Thanks Andrew! I’ll wait to see what Nikos comes up with. As you say, he might point out some very interesting options in that line that I didn’t even consider or know existed.

    Thank you for taking the time to reply.

    James

  61. I had another query on Nikos’ new upcoming book.

    I was just wondering in the Blackmar Diemer gambit, does he recommend full acceptance with 4..exf3 5 Nxf3 and then some 5th move, or does he deviate earlier than full acceptance.

    Thank you.

    James

  62. @Andrew Greet
    That is given as Euwe’s Defence in Lanes book from way back when. I will look that up and see what I can see….

    It’s been a good day for some titbits on Nikos 1 d4 d5. I think it will be jammed with really rich content. I haven’t looked forward to a book so much in a long time.

    James

  63. Interested on Marin approach against Austrian and 4. Le3. 6…Sa6 with 8…Lg4 would be good line for Black. And 4. Le3 c6 or 4. Ae3 Ag7, I feel both are good.

  64. Edgar allan poe

    Hello, by reading in the (otherwise)fabolous e3 poison i found a hole in Mr. Smith repertoire. He proposes
    1.Sf3 e6 2.e3 d5 3.c4 Sf6 4.b3 but what about 4….. c6 to get a semislav sidestepping miss meran?
    Can you tell me what i am missing
    Best regards

  65. @ Jacob Aagaard

    Great! Very much looking forward to these two books. And also to the third volume on Tal! Speaking of which, any chance of an excerpt for that one?

    Thanks for all these great books!

  66. Who are those in the last picture of the excerpt? It would seem Ivanchuck and Shirov, but I most probably am mistaken.

  67. I would like to build a repertoire based on 4 books:

    Niko’s 2 books for black e5&d5
    John’s 2 books for White e4

    Is there any advantage to having a classical repertoire like this?

    For example reinforcing important skills, training a logical handling of the fundamentals of chess, increasing knowledge which could be applicable to other areas of the game, etc? Please help!

    🙂

  68. @FM To Be
    I’d like to add something here if I may. I am about 1900 Elo, but I don’t play regularly. I played a number of years ago, left it, then came back a couple of years ago. I was switching my openings from when I first played, and I tried the Pirc as black, and the King’s Indian. I never felt too comfortable with the lack of space as black (I don’t care which superstars plays the King’s Indian).

    I got the first six Yusupov books this year (February), and although I sometimes used a board (and sometimes didn’t) I can still remember sitting at the board and doing the first exercise in the first book.

    I then went back to playing 1 e4 e5 as black and the positions I got when I played online (5 minutes each) were ones I as recognising from the books. I had a better idea of what I was doing having looked at the Yusupov books.

    To cut a long story short, it feels much better for me to have a classical repertoire as black rather than fiddle around with less space/less frequently seen openings having looked at Yusupov and that is why I’m looking forward to Nikos’ new book.

  69. That said, I’m looking forward to Marin’s book on the Pirc as I think it is good to have an alternative, perhaps more combative opening in your repertoire. I think Marin will do an excellent job.

  70. Hi John,

    How are you getting on with Playing 1. e4 book 2? Does a March/April 2018 release seem feasible at this point in time?

    Thank you very much.

    James

  71. Gollum :
    Who are those in the last picture of the excerpt? It would seem Ivanchuck and Shirov, but I most probably am mistaken.

    You are most likely not mistaken 😉
    I’m pretty sure about Ivanchuk und almost sure about Shirov as well.

  72. Reyk :

    Gollum :
    Who are those in the last picture of the excerpt? It would seem Ivanchuck and Shirov, but I most probably am mistaken.

    You are most likely not mistaken
    I’m pretty sure about Ivanchuk und almost sure about Shirov as well.

    I achieved the same results when I saw the picture.
    For Shirov, i’s almost sure because he is a latvian like Tal himself.

  73. Are there any plans to convert John’s King’s Gambit for FC? This book is probably the last word on KG for years to come, so it will be great to have an electronic version.

  74. Edgar allan poe :
    […]He proposes1.Sf3 e6 2.e3 d5 3.c4 Sf6 4.b3 but what about 4….. c6 to get a semislav sidestepping miss meran?
    Can you tell me what i am missing
    Best regards

    This seems like a valid question to me as well. And I am sure QC has a better answer than proposing to buy another book from another publisher ;-).

  75. LE BRUIT QUI COURT

    @Jacob Aagaard
    Do you have perhaps an author in mind or alreday hired, and when is book likely out? I know that we’re talking about distant future, but I would like to hope for such book 🙂

  76. Dear Jacob,

    If a player builds a repertoire based on 4 books:

    White: e3 poison
    Black: Niko’s QGD, Johan Hellsten’s Kan, Vassilios Kotronias’ Anti-Sicilian

    The idea is to play e3 poison for both Black and White …

    Is there any disadvantage for this idea … ?

    Thanks …

  77. @Leaf
    Well, it could be a bit boring, and maybe not optimal for your general chess development if you get the same type of positions on the board over and over again.

  78. @Leaf
    Think Hellsten’s book is somewhat out dated now (an opportunity for QC perhaps) but otherwise throw Cummings book on the English and Pert’s book on the Ragozin and it sounds like a pretty solid/good repertoire to me.

  79. If it’s anywhere as thorough as the English, then it will be. But it’s one volume, not three, and as openings go there’s not much out there on the ABA. Oh well, I’ll just have to hope. And yes, aside from GM 6 I’ve never been disappointed by any QC books. @The Doctor

  80. Mike :
    Jacob: Third attempt here and I hope it’s a charm. Does Marin’s Pirc cover the Archbishop Attack? Thank you.

    I think the Archbishop Attack is something with Be3, h3 and g4 – if so, then yes it’s covered. Or 4.h3 and 5.g4, without Be3, is also covered.

  81. Hi John!

    How are you getting on with Playing 1 e4 vol. 2? Are we looking at an early (March) 2018 release?

    Thank you very much.

    James

  82. @ John Shaw

    I guess it must be frustrating deciding how to deal with all those ‘0.00’ engine assessments in the Najdorf 🙂 .

  83. @John Shaw
    Thanks, John. I can’t wait to order a copy. Then I’ll wait no so patiently for the final two volumes of Avrukh’s 1 d4, maybe a QGD and definitely the Najdorf, not to mention the final twho volumes of Negi’s 1 e4. At that point I should have all I ever need of openings in this lifetime. The final ongoing tasks would be to keep theory updated.
    Non-opening books: Tal and whomever else Karolyi profiles, hopefully Petrosian, Spassky and Smyslov. Anyone else would be appreciated.

  84. Thomas Mørkøre

    A Good book on spassky’s games is long overdue! In some interviews I have seen, the great man is toying with the idea to write a game collection himself. But I dont think that Will ever happen. Karolyi books are both instructive and educational. I really enjoy to sit with my chess set, have a Good cup of cofee and play through the games of Tal and Karpov with the radio in the background.

  85. @Pat
    We publish our books in twos or threes, so that the smaller dealers can order new books without having disproportionately high postage costs when ordering them. They are the foundation of our business, our promotional system, by taking our books out to tournaments.

    I don’t do the dates, but this is the situation. This is why it is taking a bit extra.

  86. Hi, is there any QC book covering the Ruy Lopez Deferred Steinitz (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 d6, intending …Bd7 and quick …g6-Bg7) for either colour? it seems to replace the Philidor as the potato-masher opening, no doubt due to outstanding contributions by Negi and Shaw on Philidor white side. So, any coverage of the Deffered Steinitz before Negi Spanish book?

  87. For 99.99% OTB players (in which I am), the Berlin Endgame is quite difficult to play for Black. Plus, a4 and Re1 lines are not great point-grinders as well. Most common point-grinders vs e4 are the Modern and Philidor, the latter being replaced – in my experience – by the Deferred Steinitz. hence the question.

  88. I see – but in that case maybe the Pirc would also be a good point-grinder option? At least it also puts a pawn on d6 🙂 .

  89. What about the Scandinavian with Qd8 as a potato-masher vs e4? It isn’t pretty but avoids the early move alternatives of 1.e4 e5.

  90. Point-grinding (admittedly better than potato-mashing) is not about beating really bad players with any opening. It’s when you face decent players, whom you should beat, without using your peer-to-peer repertoire aimed at equalizing (esp 1.e4 e5). Such players can prepare against sharp variations or find a killer move over the board, but tend to drift and make more inaccuracies than yourself when there’s no clear threat or plan. So, point-grinders have no forced draws, few unavoidable critical positions, many divergent paths (to mitigate book or computer preparation), and allow to gradually put pressure on the opponent. Also, as this is for OTB play, it doesn’t matter if the resulting positions are within computers’ drawing zone.

    In my eyes the Deferred Steinitz fits the bill for an 1…e5 player, and deserves study from both sides. I don’t know all QC books content, that”s why I asked if this opening was covered someplace ?

  91. Cowe :
    In my eyes the Deferred Steinitz fits the bill for an 1…e5 player, and deserves study from both sides. I don’t know all QC books content, that”s why I asked if this opening was covered someplace ?

    I don’t think so as it doesn’t fit Ntirlis’ repertoire and John Shaw opted for Scotch. Negi is yet to come. Finally it’s not in Marin’s and Brunello’s books either. The only other place in the opening department, I’m not sure of, are Naiditsch’s evolution books. Besides game collections etc. of course.

  92. I.m.o. the Deferred Steinitz doesn’t justify a whole book – a few pages with some key ideas should be enough. After all, that’s the whole point of playing such an opening with a low-theory approach.

  93. @Sam
    Thanks for the link! the intro gives away a small trick: this opening works better if White is not familiar with King”s Indian positions. yet the best player should prevail anyway.

    By the way, there is no coverage for the Italian as well, with neither colour? that would be sensible, since;

    a) despite Nikos’ efforts, his Two Knights line against Ng5 and Bd3 looks a bit shaky, Black has a small material deficit but enough chaos to claim compensation ;

    b) if I were going to play d3 in the Spanish, where Black can have an improved Breyer, I would rather play the d3/c3/(a4) italian instead, with slippery equality.

  94. By the way, there is a non-QC book devoted to the Steinitz Deferred – Slay the Spanish! by Timothy Taylor, from 2011.

  95. I don’t need a book on the Qd8 Scandinavian; only suggesting it as a low-maintenance alternative to 1.e4 e5.
    Jacob, have you exited the 1.d4 d5 typesetting dungeon? 😉

  96. 3 and last try any books of the alekhine defence or a book from dreev of navara in the pipeline

    many grreetings hasan

  97. Any more news on the Najdorf book?

    I don’t want to know any lines just if it’s being written and maybe what stage it’s at?

    P.S. I also agree that a ‘Playing the English’ would be welcome!!

  98. Would it be a good estimate that 1. d4 d5 and Pirc release on 20-something September, in the last week of the month?

  99. Leon Trotsky :
    Would it be a good estimate that 1. d4 d5 and Pirc release on 20-something September, in the last week of the month?

    I was hoping around this date too for both, but then revised it mentally to second week in October…

    James

  100. Hello, not sure if it’s the right place to ask, but are there any plans to make some QC classics like Maizelis “The Soviet Chess Primer” or Romanovsky “Soviet Middlegame Technique” available on Forward Chess?
    FC versions of “My System” and “Chess Praxis” are really well done, would love to see more classics on it.
    Thanks.

  101. @Richard
    No, not really. Everything we want on Forward Chess is already there, except for Positional Play, which I still have to update a bit before it goes up 🙁

  102. Is “Quality Chess Puzzle book” (Shaw) a little easier than “Calculation” (Aagard)?
    It’s a good idea reading the chapters on calculation of the Yusupov books before the two above?
    For people with little time available

    Thanks.

  103. Jose :
    Is “Quality Chess Puzzle book” (Shaw) a little easier than “Calculation” (Aagard)?
    It’s a good idea reading the chapters on calculation of the Yusupov books before the two above?
    For people with little time available
    Thanks.

    Hi all,
    I’m also interested to hear Jacob’s point of view about that !

  104. @Jose
    Yes, it is generally easier, but in level there is not such a big difference between them. The Puzzle Book is good, maybe somewhat underrated. Reading Yusupov’s stuff is always good; there are many good ways of working on chess…

  105. Play the openings of your repertoire and analysis of games with the openings that you play to learn patterns
    Training visualization and calculation
    Play and study endgames
    I think this is the most basic

  106. Looking forward to Avrukh 2A, hoping he will give 8.Bf4 in the KID after 6…Nc6 and 7…a6. Seems like it is scoring extremely well at the moment and it isn’t all that easy for black to equalize.

  107. I’m somewhat surprised 1.d4 d5 will be only 336 pages long, considering the breadth of variations that are covered. I was expecting the book to easily clock in at 400+ pages.

  108. @cashparov
    Worried it will be similar to the semi slav book- a much thinner tome than his e4 e5 book. The semi slav book was great for getting a draw but so many lines ended in a perpetual (esp in the botvinnik) or with no play that it wasn’t suitable to ‘play the book’ if you wanted to win. I liked eg Bologan’s idea of a back up line for when you do need this- hoping this won’t be the case with the QGD

  109. @John Shaw
    Hi John,

    I’e just seen that the excerpt is up! It looks like it is going to be another winner for Nikos. I can’t wait for the end of September.

    Thank you very much.

    James

  110. Previous books on QGD ( Schandorff, Dreev, Kornev, Watson..) were all from white ´s point of view. Having Nikos book’s defending black’s side will be very interresting.

  111. Hi John,

    I’m sure it is, but could I just check that the Veresov is covered in Chapter 6 of Playing 1 d4 d5? It might seem a trivial point but I don’t see an arrow on the b1 knight at the start of chapter 6.

    Thank you.

    James

  112. .
    I know it’s a bit soon… but anyway.

    Nikos, I dont want to research for myself a repertoire against 1.c4 and 1.Nf3, how about you writting a book with a repertoire against these 2 moves plus other “offbeat” openings such 1.b3, 1.b4, 1.g3, 1.g4 and 1.f4? Blending with the repertoire you suggested against d4 and e4 of course.

    I want you to build me a total repertoire for Black 🙂

    What do you think?

  113. @FM To Be
    What you have asked has been done in Mikhalevski last year. The only thing is he doesn’t specifically recommend a ‘specifically QGD’ approach to 1 Nf3 and 1 c4. Nikos is doing that, and the rest is in Mikhalevski.

    What would be the point in Nikos doing a book on what you propose? Mightn’t his time be spent better looking at something else?

    James

  114. @James2
    .
    James2

    In the “1.d4 d5” excerpt, Nikos says he will give advice against 1.c4 and 1.Nf3, but that for a full repertoire one should do the research oneself, thats why I though about a repertoire for this based on the QGD specifically.

    Regarding the other minor openings, Mikhalevski is probably quite detailed as the rest of the “GM Repertoire” series, and I was thinking of an “easier” repertoire by Nikos (GM guide/Playing the), one that suits the QGD/e5 approach/structure he recommends in his repertoires.

    I have no idea about these minor openings and I wouldnt like to follow a repertoire that may go against the spirit/structure/preference of Nikos repertoires that I would be studying.

  115. @FM To Be I haven’t seen the Nikos book yet obviously. Even though 1…d5 is not my repertoire, I will buy it since I enjoyed his previous book. To your question on QGD repertoire against the English and 1 Nf3. I am an English player and have spent too much time looking at these lines. Against 1 c4 e6 2 g3 d5 3 Bg2 Nf6 4 Nf3 Be7 5 0-0 0-0 6 b3 b6 is solid for Black. Marin gave 7 Bb2 Bb7 8 e3 Nbd7 9 Nc3 Ne4. Marin analyzed 10 Ne2 while Delcev analyzed 10 Qe2. Good luck finding a real advantage for White. Mikhalevski gives 1 Nf3 d5 2 e3 Nf6 3 c4 e6 4 Nc3 or 4 b3 recommending 4…c5 against both. In e3 Poison Smith introduces subtleties in these position to consider. As White, I am OK playing these positions as pawn structure changes and breaks are available to create chances. But, that is also true for Black. To build a repertoire as Black, probably looking at 3 or 4 key games is all that is required and understanding the structures. Against the other moves, I would buy Mikhalevski’s book. It certainly has opened my eyes to other possibilities that are fun to play. My repertoire was too narrow for too long and I am working to change that.

  116. @ FM To Be

    You should simply do yourself a favour and buy Mikhalevski’s book. It’s really really good, and totally in classical style (putting pawns in the centre whenever possible). I play his repertoire against 1.Nf3 and it fits fine with the rest of my repertoire against 1.d4 (Nimzo from Roiz and Ragozin from Pert).

  117. Concerning Nikos 1.d4 d5-Book:

    I’m very impressed and partly surprised by the choices Nikos offers the reader (realy looking forward for 6…b6 against 5.Bf4!!) but over all I think it’s going to be a great book, too (I really love the 1.e4 e5 one!).
    One thing that makes me wonder is the published chapter dealing with line 3c (exchange, short castling). I have checked these lines myself in the past and came to understand the power of the early 8.h3. I couldn’t find equality for black in these lines – maybe because I overestimate the Exchange Variation from Whites point of view. It would be nice to know wether Nikos adresses 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd exd 5.Bg5 c6 6.e3 Be7 7.Bd3 Nbd7 8.h3 at all (maybe in the not yet published section 3a?).
    Thanks for your answer

  118. Hello guys,

    The book has a repertoire againt 1.Nf3/1.c4. I couldn’t name it “complete” because i do not look at every possible move and GM game ever played (following a scientific “GM-Rep”-style approach). So, i think that this part of the book with only a bit of personal research (mainly on the sidelines) will be “complete” for anybody.

    @Doug Exckert:
    Obviously the line you give is fine for Black and in fact he has a few choices (put the bishop on b7 or a6 for example). BUT, you have to be able to play the Be7-dxc4 line against the Catalan. As i am offering a different Catalan line, it was a bit more difficult to find a playable line for Black which is a fit for the repertoire but also fine from a theoretical point of view.

  119. I would like to add my homage to the Mikhalevski book too. Worthy of book of the year consideration in my opinion.

  120. Like Axels idea of a repertoire based on pawn structure.
    I play the Dutch leningrad against 1.d4, 1.c4, 1.Nf3 and 1.g3.
    I consider start playing the bird Leningrad although I know black will easily equalize if he knows what he is doing.

    The benefits are that I will reach the same pawn structures and have a better understanding than most of my opponents which of course is a practical advantage
    I will use the sicilian against 1.e4.
    Thus there are only three openings to learn, bird, dutch and Sicilian.

    Tried this repertoire in blitz and it was a success. Is the repertoire good enough to use it even against GMs in classical chess?

    I have played all kind of openings earlier and have a lot of experience in different pwn structures. Is this repertoire too limiting?

  121. @bebbe
    If you play only A limited number of game per year [<20]. Then, even with a limited repertoire you will have A variety of games. With many more games, playing the same system again and again is boring….that is why we change opening regulary.

  122. @bebbe
    GM H. Danielsen had similar ideas and wrote a book about the Bird Leningrad called “The Polar Bear”. I once had a chance to browse through the book and I remember that he suggested to place the queen on c2 instead of e1…

  123. @RYV

    I play only 3-10 classical games per year. 15 years ago I played 40-70 classical games per year. That I play so rarely is one of the main reasons of why I consider this change. It is hard to keep up with the theory in a lot of different openings. When I start playing more it is time to widen the repertoire.

    @Bulkington

    I am aware of H.Danielsens approach. He plays the bird/dutch Leningrad in a different way than I do. More positional. I prefer to place the queen on e1/e8 which may sometimes lead to a big attack on the kingside.

  124. @bebbe
    If you want to play the same kind of opening with black and white, you should consider playing KIA and KID. Many IM and GM plays this way Nf3(f6)-g3(g6)-Bg2(g7)-00-d3(d6) whatever opponent’s move.

  125. @John Johnson
    Which one? his Open Spanish is a masterpiece in the litteral sense, a book of outstanding quality whatever the merits of this opening. Hope Marin’s Pirc is made in the same wood. Minor Openings I didn’t read, just looks too big for a single paper book.

  126. I have Beating Minor Openings. It is a fantastic book. Similar in concept to Avrukh’s 1 d4 Sidelines. I would recommend it to anyone looking for something against non 1 e4 and 1 d4.

    James

  127. @RYV

    Yes I know. I have played the KID a lot. It really is a high maintenance opening.
    White has so many critical tries. I like the Leningrad dutch better at the moment.
    There are fewer really critical tries for white. I like the kind of play it leads to with play over the whole board. There is also no exchange variation. In the KID there are many.

  128. Weakening the kingside by moving the f pawn before closing the center seems too dangerous to me ( king safety is my major concern ). So i feel the KI set up more convicing when it comes to avoid opening debate and concentrate on middle game.

  129. I agree that kring safety is an issue in the leningrad. Whites space advantage in the kid is also a concern. Black is also more likely to end up in a position without counterplay.

  130. The Leningrad Dutch is not as bad as it looks and from theoretical point of view Black holds his own in the main lines easily. It is of course dangerous for both sides so it’s not always a practical choice but if you need to beat weaker player then it certainly is.

  131. @piongu

    I agree although I also think it is possible to beat stronger players as well. The Leningrad is not for players who are afraid of losing. What is your opinion of the Bird Leningrad? Does whites extra move matter?

  132. @ Bebbe

    I don’t think white’s extra tempo matters in the Bird Leningrad. Check out Mikhalevski 🙂 . As with most ‘reversed’ openings, black can get easy equality. But I guess the idea is that white can compensate for that with better knowledge of the typical plans and structures (e.g., I have played chess for many years, but NEVER encountered the Bird Leningrad). On the other hand, if you play this against a seasoned 1.d4 player I guess it shouldn’t be too difficult for him to find something behind the board.

  133. After 1.d4 f5 black has a grip on the e4square (and some weakness on kinfside)
    After 1.f4 white already get the weakened kingside but not the full control of the e5 square as black is still able to play pawn d6. So I would prefer to play f4 only after black has play d5

  134. In a way the Dutch Leningrad is reactive (not passive). White has plenty of very different and forcing setups against the f5/d6 structure and Black reacts accordingly. With Black one can easily end up in an e6-d5 structure or a stonewall or you have hanging pawns on e5 and f5 not to mention the nasty anti-systems. Playing the Leningrad system with White, however, this reactive nature obviously does not exist, White is in the driver seat… Malanjuk never played it with White.
    Any way, that`s just theory. What matters is OTB. Certainly it sound like a plan, quite a naughty approach.

  135. There is something strange saying the Dutch defense is playable and the bird opening is not …but from gm practice, it looks to be true.

  136. @QC
    My summer madness is over, hiking in England, oh man. In the rare moments I had both cellular coverage and a dry environment I tried to connect to the QC blog. I must say, to read the blog from a mobile phone is quite unpleasant. You might want to consider to give the web page a bit of a face lift, templates supporting adaptation to screen size are state of the art meanwhile.

  137. @Bebbe Actually you are asking the right person 😀 I have played more than 100 classical games in 1.f4 (usually it was the Leningrad Bird) and I managed to beat some GMs. With best play from Black I don’t claim White has any advantage but then we can argue if White has any adantage in any other opening. There are different type of advantages for a practical player and getting the position you understand better is one such advantage you can think about playing the Bird.
    As for Mikhalevski’s recommendation – I can’t say it’s bad but many players tend to avoid the main lines in Leningrad Dutch and play for instance 1.d4 f5 2.Nc3 so even if someone is 1.d4 player it might not be the most practical option to enter the main line especially being tempo down which is important in some lines.

    @Bulkington It’s not true, late GM Malaniuk played 1.f4 from time to time.

  138. @piongu

    I am lucky, you are an expert. I agree on what you say about the practical advantages. You have proved that it can work.
    What is Mikhalevskis recommendation?

  139. @bulkington

    White can easily create the reactive nature by for instance playing kh1 at some point. Then white can use the theory that exists about the leningrad dutch. Besides kh1 can sometimes be useful.

  140. @Ray

    The d4-player might have an antidutch line in his/her repertoire. Then the positons arising from The bird leningrad might not be familiar.

  141. @Ryv

    The bird is of course playable. The only disadvantage is that it is easier for black to equalize than after the more usual ways to opening the game.

  142. Bebbe :
    @bulkington
    White can easily create the reactive nature by for instance playing kh1 at some point. Then white can use the theory that exists about the leningrad dutch. Besides kh1 can sometimes be useful.

    this way, you are not trying to get advantage by playing white. It is just loosing a tempo to play your favorite defense.

  143. @Bebbe
    Mikhalevsky goes for principled main lines which has to be objectively good. But from practical point of view it’s not easy to play for everyone. As far as I observed even most of GMs below 2650 don’t fully understand all chess structures (I think also GM Kovalenko did a video on that discussing some differences between 2700 GMs and some ‘weaker’ GMs). Of course learning all chess structures is essential (that’s why I love a book by Flores Rios) but there are so many other things along the way you should master and many strong players have quite narrow opening repertoire.

    Kh1 might be counterproductive sometimes so be careful when playing it. It’s not easy to use the extra tempo but I worked on that many years and there are some interesting ideas. The Bird will never be cutting edge opening but there are some unexplored areas and I think it is underestimated currently.

  144. @Bebbe, @piongu
    There is some strong support for your approach:

    Carlsen – Kramnnik, Leuven 2017 1-0.

    It was a rapid game but Kramnik simply got outplayed.

  145. Almost everything is “0.00” nowadays, so go ahead and play whatever you like 🙂 . Still, imo an ambitious white player should try for the initiative rather than play a reactive opening, but I guess that’s just my personal view. I play Mikhalevski’s recommendations against the Bird and it really looks like comfortable equality to me. Against die-hard 1.f4 players I think it’s easy to prepare a suitable line, since white’s path is quite narrow.

  146. An Ordinary Chessplayer

    1.g3 d5 2.f4 is an interesting move order. It seems effective against players who only play 1.e4 as white. Thanks to David Vigorito for pointing this out to me. The Bird is playable, but in my white games it seems to be one opening where the practical result has almost nothing to do with the theoretical evaluation of the opening.

  147. @Ray

    I have used this approach. Now I will try to be more practical. I think leningrad bird/dutch positions are quite flexible. The solution is to vary the move order to not become a target.

  148. @Ray
    Sure but it’s not like I’m recommending any ambitious player to play only one opening. 1.f4 is just an interesting flank opening which deserves more attention than it currently has and that’s it 😉

    Personally I play it more seriously but it’s just because I love it and I play it since my childhood. I always enjoy posing more problems than my opponents expect. I’m amateur who wants to get GM title and this secret weapon helps me along the way 😉

  149. I wonder what the verdict is on From´s Gambit 1.f4 e5. I remember Mikhalevski wrote he wanted to recommend it but found some problems for Black that are not easy to solve. I know after 2.fxe5 d6 3.exd6 Bxd6 4.Nf3 g5 5.g3 is supposed to be good for White but what is the best line against 4…Nf6 intending to develop rapidly and attack with …Ng4 and …h5-h4 in case White plays g3?

  150. piongu :
    @Tom Tidom
    […] You can follow engine’s suggestions in this line.

    I did that a while ago and was under the impression that Black´s compensation shouldn´t be underestimated after 5.Nc3 Nc6, e.g. 6.d4 0-0 7.e4 Bb4 and White´s center is a bit shaky. But of course there are other ways for White on move 6.

  151. Hi all at QC,

    I was just wondering if you have any more information regarding a prospective publication date for Negi 5 please?

    Thank you very much.

    James

  152. @RYV
    I just noticed that no one has replied to this question. (Nikos has been busy getting married so I think we can forgive him.) Nikos argues that it is worth including …h6 before …Nh5, and he shows why it is useful in certain lines he recommends. I can’t think of any major drawback of …h6 in any part of his repertoire.

  153. But probably he won’t recommend 5…0-0 6.Bd3 Nc6, since this has been treated in two recent repertoire books by Hillarp Persson and Kornev. Maybe 5…c5, but then he has to find something against Greet’s Qd4.

  154. Quite reliable? Doesn’t white get a dangerous attack? Anyway, I’m happy with 5…0-0 6.Bd3 Nc6, so I’ll definitely stick to that. Black has no problem at all in that variation.

  155. If I remember correclt, I think I saw in the database that Marin played 5…0-0 6. Ad3 Ca6 7. 0-0 c5 8. d5 Ag4.

    I think that this is a good, fighting line for Black.

  156. I´am very exited about the new book `Playing 1.d4 d5`by Nikos and as always I will buy it on FC and as Hardcover…
    Now there remain one question for me and perhaps many others:
    John, is it sure that we will have your second book ´Playing 1.e4`at latest under the Christmas tree….in the year 2017? I´am looking not so much for a prediction but more for a promise….
    Keep up the great work!
    wolfsblut

  157. @Wolfsblut
    John is working hard in the dungeon. The first commitment is to quality. So, he is trying, but it is a big endeavor as you will appreciate. What Negi did in three and a half book and Khalifman in 200, John will attempt to do in one.

    Give him some space please, he is not George R.R. Martin, who is working on everything else than the conclusion of the series :-).

  158. Why not have two columns ?
    A classical ” Coming soon ”
    And another one named ” Dungeon ball and chain author(s) at work ” ?

  159. I jacob
    Is there someone else in the dungeon preparing for 2018 ?
    Few weeks/months ago, there were posts about the classical/scheveningen sicilian, about a Kan/Taimanov sicilian book and a possible Najdorf sicilian new volume by a mysterious author ?
    Can you also tell us about other new projects ? (I dont care about publishing schedule, but rather interested in the kind of book you are intented…if not a secret)

  160. @RYV
    We have a few chatty books coming that we have not mentioned. Two of them by really strong GMs. I am editing one of them. They will pretty much come out of nowhere, but hopefully be very welcome.

    We have a guy working on a Kan book, but let’s see what happens. Sometimes people abandon projects and they should be allowed to do so. We have never talked about a book on the Classical Sicilian! But a few die-hards mention it all the time :-).

  161. Well, Tiger was writing something again right? Isn’t this also his “big” work on something like “his way of chess”? 🙂

  162. @Jacob Aagaard
    so we have to guess who are those 2″really strong GMs”.
    what is a really strong GM ?
    top 20 ?
    above 2700 ?
    former world champion or candidate ?
    experienced player ( many tournaments wins) ?
    player & trainer ?
    Ivanchouk ?

  163. In the database I see that Marin plays quite a few Pirc lately 😀

    He played 4. Ae3 c6 against Landa, but 4…Ag7 against Hou in a blitz.

    I still feel like 5…0-0 agains the Austrian is likely.

  164. We have never talked about a book on the Classical Sicilian! But a few die-hards mention it all the time :-).

    Did you just say Quality Chess was working on a book about the Classical Sicilian?! Awesome!! 😀

  165. Jacob Aagaard :
    @RYV
    We have a few chatty books coming that we have not mentioned. Two of them by really strong GMs. I am editing one of them. They will pretty much come out of nowhere, but hopefully be very welcome.

    Hopefully we get a Queens Indian based on Bb7 variations to fit Mikhalevskis repertoire book 😀

  166. To distract everybody a bit from speculating about autors: I recently got the Slav book of Avrukh’s. Very nice read. But I realized most top guys with black, including the chinese players, tend to avoid the classical Slav line with bf5, which Avrukh is proposing. They rather opt for a6 Slavs. Or in case of 1.d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc 5. a4 they play e6 instead of bf5. Have I missed any theoretical news regarding the classical slav? I always thought it was one of the soundest and theoretical healthiest defences to 1.d4 …. ?

  167. Frank van Tellingen

    Isn’t this the old (and bad) way that Bogoljubow played against Alekhine? (And condemed by Kasparov in My Great Predecessors part I) What about 6.e4 in this line? Won’t White simply be better? @Lasker

  168. @Frank van Tellingen

    @Lasker

    This is a matter of fashion. The line is not for everyone. The e4 lines are very sharp, but to my eyes the e3 lines (take for example the Candidates game between Aronian and Svidler) are more critical. Black hasn’t shown complete equality there.

  169. @Frank van Tellingen
    you mean 6.e4 in the line 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc 5. a4 e6 and now 6. e4, right? And your comment is based on that line?

    It has recently been played quite a bit but I am not familiar with theory here.

    I am wondering why a lot of Slav specialists prefer a6 and such lines over bf5.

  170. Will you publish books for;
    1) Mainline Sicilian (Najdorf-Scheveningen) ?
    2)Mainline Spanish (Zaitsev-Tschigorin) ?
    I respect the huge effort you put in your publications but in my opinion this tasks are to be done yet.

  171. I think a Zaitsev Book is not really needed since there are already 2 realtively new ones out I think? The Sicilian requests will never get old though 😀

  172. hello Jacob, John, all QC team
    because of berlin, the italian game ( slow version with d3) is comming back . Is there any interest for a repertoire book on those lines….or just an old book on the subject is still ok ?

  173. Anish Giri in the forward:
    I have little doubt that the variations in this book are neither complete nor faultless and some of the evaluations are to be doubted. Some, checked under the careful microscope of serious hardware and software, can and probably will be proven over-optimistic for White, and in extreme cases may even be blatantly wrong.

  174. Ray :
    @ RYV
    There’s a quite recent book on the Slow (but venomous!) Italian, published by NIC.

    i heard many bad comments about this book..even Giri’s forwords is strange ; looks like he doesnt trust the variations !?
    that’s why i’m asking if QC has any serious work going on or planned

  175. Tim S :
    @Thomas
    That same statement could be made about any book on a White opening, by any author or publishing house.

    Rare exception: a certain book on Catalan (not Avrukh’s) that made an impression that Black is okay or even slightly better in most lines – But the book was supposed to be viewed from White’s perspective.

  176. Had a more accurate study of ” E3 Poison ” today . Nikos was right , the Gruenfeld ( or anti- Gruenfeld ) chapter is interesting … as many others .
    I was interested by Axel comments on the QI move order , allowing or not dxc4 and a QGA à la Khalifman-Salov ( even if he does not mention this game ) .
    Having a pretty long look at this bishop endgame ( Remember ” Excelling at Chess ” pp 133-137 ! ) , i let Stockfish run at 32. Bh6 ( idea is to meet …f4 with the bischop at d2 )and tried to understand why the evaluation was stopped around +3 only to discover it was another case of B+P with the wrong colour .
    The endgame is drawn ( for instance 32.Bh6 f5 33.Bd2 f4 34.gf Be7 35.f5 ( simplest ) Kxf5 36.f3 h4 37. Kf2 Bf6 38. Bxb4 Bxd4+ 39. Kg2 and so on ) .
    Maybe the reason why Salov repeated the position

  177. There is a rare rook ending at Isle of Man today : R + a,e,f, g,h vs R+e,f,g,h with Vallejo Pons with the a pawn.
    Do you know if there are theoretical reports about those positions ?

  178. An Ordinary Chessplayer

    RE Giri’s “strange” comment above – Maybe in Giri’s mind this is an argument in favor of buying the book.

  179. The above quote is incomplete and misleading, suggesting that Giri thinks the book is poor. Following directly from the above he says: “But the basic principles, the plans and the concepts as well as the model games offered in this book will help many ambitious chess lovers come closer to understanding the subtleties of this quiet yet fascinating opening.” In other words, theory doesn’t stand still but you can learn a lot from this book.

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